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Tyre woes

Started by NoNuFink, December 29, 2014, 11:37:37 am

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0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

JohnP

Yup,  tyres...

For example,  look at what rally cars use when there's lots of snow to deal with;


compared to when there isn't;
Quantum est in fenestra canini ?

FrankS

Quote from: JohnP on January 09, 2015, 23:20:11 pm
I think what has changed since the 70s is the width of tyres.  Back in 1978, my first car (a rusty Morris 1100 of 1967 vintage) had skinny little cross-ply tyres that would probably look more at home these days on a bicycle... Ok, slight exaggeration about the bicycle, 


I'm not so sure http://surlybikes.com/bikes/moonlander  :''

Cactus

Heres a weird one, drove the misses car last night, at slow speeds theres a wobble, it's moving the steering wheel about, and crown following, gess, road leans left it dives for the hedge, road leans right, it loves on coming cars.

looked at the wheels, nearly racing slicks.

probably a belt inside gone or a bulge in the tyre causing the wobble.

new set went on first thing this morn, perfect now.
I know you believe you understand what you think i said, but i am not sure you realise that what you think you heard is not what i meant.

itsme

Yep. A bulge would be bedt guess. Or a car I bought once second hand had a wobble, when they took the tires off there was nearly a pint of water in each one! I gather he had been inflating them using a compressor with no water trap.

paulinfrance

Quote from: bobt on January 11, 2015, 10:57:53 am
Yep. A bulge would be bedt guess. Or a car I bought once second hand had a wobble, when they took the tires off there was nearly a pint of water in each one! I gather he had been inflating them using a compressor with no water trap.


French tractors ( farmers ) put water in the tyres to give them more grip, they counter act the effects by drinking 10 Pastis before going to work. ::)
Mode 2 THE only way to fly

Cactus

I've got a load of water in my right tyre, went to check the pressures a couple of weeks ago and one of the stupid engineers had used it as a water line then put it back on the compressor still full of water!
probably shot half a liter in. now got a vibration at 65

cars in tomorrow for mot so i'm having it refitted same time.
I know you believe you understand what you think i said, but i am not sure you realise that what you think you heard is not what i meant.

Nordsee

Quote from: Charlie C on December 31, 2014, 21:37:10 pm
They have their place Owen but on high milaga high performance cars thry are a menace.

Charlie C
Why do you want High Performance cars in the UK? Roads like cart tracks, 70 mph Speed ,Limit, if you can find a bit of road free enough  and wide enough to attempt to reach that speed,Speed Cameras everywhere, any old car will do .

PDR

Well in the UK it's only speed camera CASINGS that are common. Actual speed cameras are quite rare. For example in Hampshire (the county with the most motorway miles in the UK, believe it or not) there are 30 fixed camera casings, but onl;y six actual cameras that they move between them. Fixed cameras are being phased out (by way of not being replaced when they fail) in Hants, Surrey and Sussex because it is felt that they don't achieve much. Mobile cameras (vans and individual policemen with hand-held lasers) will be continued, as they have demonstrable effect.

Likewise in Hants and Surrey you actually have to work at it to get points for speeding. Up to 42 in a 30 limit (and pro-rata for the higher ones) will get you the offer of a driving awareness course (which you can now repeat after only 2 years rather than the previous 3 or 4) for the simple reason that these have proven more effective in reducing accident rates than points and/or courts.

Of course if you really put in the effort you can still get your day in court, but you have to work at it. I gather more and more of the other police forces are moving over to this sort of approach.

PDR
There are no shortcuts on the long, hard road to success. But if your dad's rich there could a limo service...

Michael_Rolls

Good to hear - must be a better idea to try and improve people's driving rather than simply stuffing the coffers and feeding resentment
Mike
Properly trained, a man can be a dog's best friend

Cactus

attempt?? i can get 70, sorry 60 ;) ( NSL ) on the back B roads i drive to work every day.
high performance cars just make that more enjoyable and increase you're cornering speed.
besides, a Veyron will be a lot nicer at 70 on a motorway than an old Ford Anglia which can also reach 70.
I know you believe you understand what you think i said, but i am not sure you realise that what you think you heard is not what i meant.

Michael_Rolls

Quote from: Nordsee on January 21, 2015, 11:41:15 am
Why do you want High Performance cars in the UK? Roads like cart tracks, 70 mph Speed ,Limit, if you can find a bit of road free enough  and wide enough to attempt to reach that speed,Speed Cameras everywhere, any old car will do .

whilst my car (Honda CR-V) certainly isn't in the high performance bracket, I would disagree with your comment that 'any old car will do'. Phil mentioned the Ford Anglia which, as it happens, was the first car I ever owned, something like 50 years ago. No comparison for safety nor comfort. Also, whilst around here (rural Perthshire) few of the minor roads are safe at the 60 limit they are subject to, there are those who try - and some succeed, and some are the reason why Scotland's minor road have poor safety records, there are quite a few major roads, even up here, where you can reach 70 and maintain it for a while (but usually not a very long while!)
Driving down to see our daughter last year (280 miles then, they have since moved further away) I averaged fractionally under 60 miles (excluding pit stops) for the journey - and the CR-V did just over 40mpg for the journey. The Anglia was hard pushed to get 30 mpg.
Mike
Properly trained, a man can be a dog's best friend

PDR

Quote from: Michael_Rolls on January 21, 2015, 14:09:22 pm
The Anglia was hard pushed to get 30 mpg.


You must have had a leak in the tank - whilst pushed it shouldn't consume any fuel at all (but I agree that being pushed was a fairly common operating scenario for an Anglia, though)

PDR
There are no shortcuts on the long, hard road to success. But if your dad's rich there could a limo service...

Michael_Rolls

Oddly enough, I did once have a leak from the tan. Whilst stationary in a line of traffic, I observed a police patrol car waiting to come out of a side road, so when the car in front of me moved off I waved the police car in, whereupon the dozy idiot behind rammed into the back of me, The police did him for driving without due wotsit and he was fine £100 (this was about 1969 so quite a belt and serve the twit right).
A day or two later I noticed a strong smell of petrol when you stood beside the car. The tank on the Anglia hung underneath the boot, secured by a metal strap which was insulated from direct contact with the tank by a thick bit of fairly firm sponge rubber. The impact had caused a small split in the tank and the leakage was being absorbed by the rubber.
Knowing no better at the time, I drained the tank and patched the hole with fiberglass bandage - worked a treat!
Mike
Properly trained, a man can be a dog's best friend

PDR

Quote from: Michael_Rolls on January 21, 2015, 15:42:21 pm
Knowing no better at the time, I drained the tank and patched the hole with fiberglass bandage - worked a treat!


What a bodge - surely you know you should have silver-soldered it...

PDR
There are no shortcuts on the long, hard road to success. But if your dad's rich there could a limo service...

Michael_Rolls

Properly trained, a man can be a dog's best friend

Bad Raven

Ah the Fraud Anglebox, what a car.  Std tyres like washers.

Friend had one (we were students, no money and less sense, I had a Riley 1.5).  I was passenger in the Anglia when he got it into a bend too fast, terminal understeer and no power or decent handbrake to correct that, so he used the petrol station forecourt on the outside of the bend exit as run off, through the pumps at unstoppable speed and on.  :o
Later he clapped the engine out, so I rebuilt it.  Ported and tuned it at the same time. His idea of running in was to take it off the speedo and hold it there after a days use...........it seized.

I had an olive green Anglia Van "work vehicle", also an Oxford Estate (nasty) and a Hillman Hunter (even worse). I preferred the Anglia as a former person in my post had in his day a mate in Motor Transport, and he removed the restrictor plate and tuned it. It used to rocket (relative to anything else we had) up to "off the speedo" pointing at the Main Beam or Oil Warning light, but if you hit a bad bump it'd get steering washout and the only way then was to let the speed drop gently, no braking or it became very unstable. Used to be fun in the city against Taxi's, one of the few things that they'd bail out attacking and give a wide berth.

One of the RC car bodies currently in the school club fleet I run is an Anglia!! (you might not think 11-13 year olds would know or care, but mine do!!)


The user formerly know as Bravedan........... Well if Prince can do it....................

Cactus

Can't reccomened my Dunlops for snow and ice.
what you basically have is a solid strip of rubber in the middle, two more either side of that with small grooves that wear out after 2mm of life then more groves in the shoulders that wear out about half of the tyres life.
so what you end up with is essentially an old F1 grooved tyre.
ace on the roads in the summer, utterly useless in snow and ice as i found out last week.

taking the misses car to work next time, she's got nice new Goodridge tyres.
I know you believe you understand what you think i said, but i am not sure you realise that what you think you heard is not what i meant.

meharibear

Quote from: Cactus on February 10, 2015, 13:12:57 pm
utterly useless in snow and ice as i found out last week.

taking the misses car to work next time, she's got nice new Goodridge tyres.
So leaving the poor wife to possibly crash and perish in the snow - You cad sir!  :ev
Inside every old person is a young person wondering what happened.  (Terry Pratchett)

PDR

Quote from: Cactus on February 10, 2015, 13:12:57 pm
so what you end up with is essentially an old F1 grooved tyre.


Not really, because the compound used in the tread of the road-going tyre won't be anywhere near soft enough to derive any benefit from the extra contact area. But it will look cool and will add just as much to the performance as the power-assisted nodding dog, reconditioned furry dice and finest halfords red-stripes-and-SPORT decal set...

PDR
There are no shortcuts on the long, hard road to success. But if your dad's rich there could a limo service...

Cactus

QuoteSo leaving the poor wife to possibly crash and perish in the snow - You cad sir!

a gent such as i? but no, she'll be sat in the passenger seat!

we took my car last week, overshot one junction, couldn't move from the second. wasn't fun at all.

i dunno Pete ( i did mean in appearance not performance ) , on dry roads these dunlops are bloody brilliant and the fuel mileage went from 38mph trying hard to save fuel to 41 with no effort over the Nexans i got the car with.
they get a bit sketchy when they get older in wet and slimy roads, but by then it'll be summer again.
however next time i think i'll go with something else, something with a tread pattern because these are useless when you need the grip most.
I know you believe you understand what you think i said, but i am not sure you realise that what you think you heard is not what i meant.

Nordsee

Quote from: NickK on December 30, 2014, 08:28:43 am


Tis only a recommendation , Bob - probably made by tyre companies ;D

You'd never enforce it as a law  :study:
Well I sugest you try to get a vehicle through the TÜV ( Same as your MOT), with 8 year old tyres, get an instant fail. You don't have MOT on Caravans either, we have Tests on all registered vehicles, every two years, same as a car. Trailors Vans you name it, if it has a number plate it is Tested.

meharibear

Quote from: Nordsee on February 10, 2015, 14:40:53 pm
Trailors Vans you name it, if it has a number plate it is Tested.
As our trailers and caravans do not have their own number plates (they simply have those of their towing vehicle) we get out free!  This did lead to some confusion when I had cars with French IT plates (the French do register caravans) towing a UK caravan whihc had to wear matching IT plates to satisfy UK law but then confused the French!  Luckily they usually assumed that the red IT plates were some sort of diplomatic plate (they are not) and steered clear of me!
Inside every old person is a young person wondering what happened.  (Terry Pratchett)

dogshome

February 11, 2015, 20:49:30 pm #102 Last Edit: February 11, 2015, 20:52:27 pm by dogshome
I upgraded the Autogrip P600s when they wore out  :embarassed:

I have a pair of Autogrip P308s on the front now  :)


Snow, ice, rain, white lines, gravel, motorways and grass so far. Chucked into the corners over the white lines, greasy and muddy with no drama.

Allegedly a better class than the others for wet stopping, but actually the brakes (now uprated) were the limiting factor before. I've had to stop in a hurry once (my mistake, not noticing a second SPECS camera) and the contents of the boot were successfully moved to the back of the rear seats - phone in footwell, eyeballs on stalks, etc.

I'm sure there are better tyres out there, but these are actually pretty good. I don't have a reason to use anything else  :study:
肉(ròu)包(bāo)子(zi)打(dǎ)狗(gǒu) (meat+bun(2nd and 3rd)+hit+dog)
Literally: To hit a dog with a meat-bun

dogshome

I bought a pair of Michelin cross climate after the landsails I had to fit when I got run off the road.

The landsails were fine in the dry and reasonable in the wet but wore out quickly.

Cross climates have similar grip in the dry but wet performance is not like anything I've had before. The tread is like a fine tractor type with all the ridges across the width. Aquaplaning is hugely reduced.

Ultimate grip in the wet is up and we'll see how she goes on ice and snow.

They are twice the price of budget ones though.
肉(ròu)包(bāo)子(zi)打(dǎ)狗(gǒu) (meat+bun(2nd and 3rd)+hit+dog)
Literally: To hit a dog with a meat-bun