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Shoreham Accident AAIB Report

Started by Bad Raven, March 03, 2017, 12:21:15 pm

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Bad Raven

The user formerly know as Bravedan........... Well if Prince can do it....................

Alan H

Thanks for the link, I will read with interest as I was watching the live stream at the time. My immediate reaction at the time was pilot error.

pooh

fascinating

I am always impressed by the meticulous investigation and succinct conclusions of such reports. It is tragically clear the pilot got it wrong, for reasons which will never really be established, rather than mechanical/aerodynamic failure. Even the manoeuvre approach was wrong (too low), perhaps deliberate because it is more exciting for the crowd ?
Confucious he say "more than one aircraft in the same airspace leads to structural failure"

Butzi

I thought there was still a question mark over the altimeter? Also, having seen the surface corrosion (not impact damage) on the compressor blades and stators added to the fact the engine hadn't be inhibited correctly for storage, it makes me wonder if it was giving full performance at the time of the event. As often happens this disaster was an accumulation of small errors, not just simple pilot error, which is always the easy option.

Bad Raven

Quote from: Butzi on March 03, 2017, 16:39:44 pm
Also, having seen the surface corrosion (not impact damage) on the compressor blades and stators added to the fact the engine hadn't be inhibited correctly for storage, it makes me wonder if it was giving full performance at the time of the event.


Photos taken AFTER they had been in the conflagration.
The user formerly know as Bravedan........... Well if Prince can do it....................

JohnP

Quote from: Alan H on March 03, 2017, 12:40:30 pm
Thanks for the link, I will read with interest as I was watching the live stream at the time.


I will also read it with interest - I was there on the day.  But the summary on the BBC pages doesn't suggest there's really any firm conclusion.

Quote
My immediate reaction at the time was pilot error.


That did seem quite probable...  :'(
Quantum est in fenestra canini ?

pooh

Quote from: JohnP on March 03, 2017, 18:36:41 pm
I will also read it with interest - I was there on the day.  But the summary on the BBC pages doesn't suggest there's really any firm conclusion.

That did seem quite probable...  :'(


but read the investigation report linked.

Whilst there were questions over a lot of things, going into a loop requiring a starting altitude of 500ft (not 180), with not full power, and reaching the top at a mere 110 knots at far less than the required 3500ft looks like the pilot, sadly, wasn't taking all things into consideration. It's easyto criticise from the armchair, I don't know how I would have reacted, but a display pilot has to maintain concentration on safety at all times. Having crashed several models because of misjudgement I have huge sympathy with the poor pilot, but my crashes cost money, not lives.
Confucious he say "more than one aircraft in the same airspace leads to structural failure"

Skyleader

Quote from: Butzi on March 03, 2017, 16:39:44 pm
I thought there was still a question mark over the altimeter? Also, having seen the surface corrosion (not impact damage) on the compressor blades and stators added to the fact the engine hadn't be inhibited correctly for storage, it makes me wonder if it was giving full performance at the time of the event. As often happens this disaster was an accumulation of small errors, not just simple pilot error, which is always the easy option.


What we call; all the holes lined up.

Surface Corrosion on engine components of that age and, more importantly, usage is not uncommon .I also gave a wry smile when the news report
about the accident investigation said.'....and the manuals were out of date.....;. Yes, along with the majority of privately operated aeroplanes.
'Dont just stand there; get one up!!'

itsme

I saw this very aircraft give a display at Old Warden only a year or two ago. It had all the power needed for huge loops and vertical manoeuvres. I don't know if it was the same pilot, but it was a very safe and structured display. I would be shocked to hear that the engine was not performing, and I think the AAIB would have spotted that.

Sent from my SM-A300FU using Tapatalk


Butzi

A gas turbine's performance level can drop at any time and the cause may not necessarily be picked up during flight, or even a routine inspection. As an example, the deterioration of the fuel pump diaphragm wasn't picked up until the post crash investigation and this could have contributed to performance deterioration.

Bad Raven

Quote from: Butzi on March 04, 2017, 22:26:35 pm
A gas turbine's performance level can drop at any time and the cause may not necessarily be picked up during flight, or even a routine inspection. As an example, the deterioration of the fuel pump diaphragm wasn't picked up until the post crash investigation and this could have contributed to performance deterioration.


However, the engine manufacturer stated that any drop with the deterioration found was not likely.
The user formerly know as Bravedan........... Well if Prince can do it....................

itsme

They would know. Hoof Proudfoots accident at Duxford in the P 38 finished in a ball of fire and some twisted scrap metal, yet they knew one engine was 100 rpm faster than the other. Not that that had any bearing on the accident, either.