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Sign of the times

Started by Michael_Rolls, November 25, 2017, 11:56:16 am

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Michael_Rolls

We've had our Focus estate nearly two and half years, yet it was only today that I realised two things about it:-
1. It doesn't have an ashtray - unthinkable when I first started to drive
2. Although it has the usual 12V socket (in fact two of them, plus two USB sockets) it doesn't have the grandly named 'cigar lighter' that used to be de rigeur.
Mike
Properly trained, a man can be a dog's best friend

EssJay

Mike, that does seem to be the norm on most new cars nowadays. I have a VW Tiguan mk2, and they specify a 'smokers pack' as a separate option in the price list, which is basically a removable ashtray which fits in a cup holder, and a 12v ciggie lighter all for an extra £20.
I think it's all a case of smoking becoming more and more non-PC.
No trees were harmed by this post, but some electrons have been slightly inconvenienced

The Saint. (Owen)

Does anyone remember when a heater was an optional extra?  ;) ;)
Electrickery is the work of the devil.
Proper aeroplanes are powered by engines.

itsme

Quote from: The Saint. (Owen) on November 25, 2017, 13:57:04 pm
Does anyone remember when a heater was an optional extra?  ;) ;)
And a starting handle came with it.

Sent from my SM-A300FU using Tapatalk


Steve Lewin

Yep, optional heater and rubber mats were also an optional extra. Carpets weren't even an option. And for even more you could have the vacuum wipers replaced with newfangled electric thingies.

They don't make 'em like that any more...I'm very pleased to say.

Steve

itsme

Quote from: Steve Lewin on November 25, 2017, 17:17:48 pm
Yep, optional heater and rubber mats were also an optional extra. Carpets weren't even an option. And for even more you could have the vacuum wipers replaced with newfangled electric thingies.

They don't make 'em like that any more...I'm very pleased to say.

Steve
Nothing wrong with recirculatory heaters with a rheostat to control it. crossply tyres and windows you wind with a handle. Your all soft.

JohnP

Quote from: Steve Lewin on November 25, 2017, 17:17:48 pm
And for even more you could have the vacuum wipers replaced with newfangled electric thingies.

They don't make 'em like that any more...I'm very pleased to say.

Steve


I distinctly remember the wipers on my grandfather's 1950s vintage Vauxhall Vyvern that he'd occasionally pick us up from school in back in the 1960s.  Every time he accellerated the wipers would slow to a virtual stop,  and then when he took his foot off the throttle the'y go into a comical high-speed thrash...  I guess they were better than nothing,  but not much!
Quantum est in fenestra canini ?

EssJay

And mechanical indicators that sprang to attention from the door pillar!
No trees were harmed by this post, but some electrons have been slightly inconvenienced

Michael_Rolls

Quote from: The Saint. (Owen) on November 25, 2017, 13:57:04 pm
Does anyone remember when a heater was an optional extra?  ;) ;)

I do, as was a radio, a heated rear window, spots and fog lights (all of whihc I added to my high powered Anglia! And my Wolseley 6/110 had a starting handle - and I actually used it once just to check that I could - 3 litres gave quite a kick!
MIke
Properly trained, a man can be a dog's best friend

JohnP

November 26, 2017, 22:14:22 pm #9 Last Edit: November 26, 2017, 22:15:40 pm by JohnP
Quote from: Michael_Rolls on November 26, 2017, 11:11:11 am
I do, as was a radio, a heated rear window, spots and fog lights (all of whihc I added to my high powered Anglia!


My first car,  a 1967-vintage Morris 1100 (only 10 years old at the time I acquired it, but almost terminally-rusty even at that age) had none of those either.  A radio was the first accessory I added.  Though only after replacing every single (rusty) brake pipe on the car,  replacing both rear brake cylinders,  replacing both front wings, getting a friend to weld on new outer sills and patch the front inner wings, etc. etc...

A 'stick-on' Lucas heated rear screen was the next thing, though it did have a tendency to gradually un-stick itself from the window.
Quantum est in fenestra canini ?

Dave Lowe

1952 Ford Prefect,  indicators which you had to thump the central pillow to get them to indicate, Hot wire demister stuck on the windscreen just in front of the driver, if you braked in wet weather a jet of water shot up your trouser leg, vacuum wipers that worked better when you took your foot of the accelerator, and mine was the deluxe with opening front windscreen and leather seats, Boy did I think I was somebody.
Take off optional --- landing essential..

paulinfrance

Quote from: JohnP on November 26, 2017, 22:14:22 pm
My first car,  a 1967-vintage Morris 1100 (only 10 years old at the time I acquired it, but almost terminally-rusty even at that age) had none of those either.  A radio was the first accessory I added.  Though only after replacing every single (rusty) brake pipe on the car,  replacing both rear brake cylinders,  replacing both front wings, getting a friend to weld on new outer sills and patch the front inner wings, etc. etc...

A 'stick-on' Lucas heated rear screen was the next thing, though it did have a tendency to gradually un-stick itself from the window.


Not my first car but maybe I ended up with yours, it snapped in half at the bottom of the windscreen / wheel arches on the Newcastle round about in 1975  :-\
Mode 2 THE only way to fly

EricF

November 28, 2017, 22:32:52 pm #12 Last Edit: November 28, 2017, 22:50:39 pm by EricF
My 1962 Morris Mini Minor has a dip-switch on the floor - remember those?
It also has a starting handle that goes in through the wheel arch and it still has the 'stick-on' Lucas heated rear screen in place.
However it doesn't have the luxury of wind-up windows, just a draughty, leaky, sliding arrangement.

My first and second cars, a 1956 Austin Cambridge and 1955 Morris Oxford had column gear change and front bench seats.
Three people in the front was always a very friendly way to travel :af, but two in the front in a dark car park, was even better!  :''
I'm not old, I've just been young for a very long time!

antonnick

All classic, classic  cars in themselves.

Pure nostalgia, I have discovered in old(er) Age what fun they are to drive and especially englisch classics. I purchased a 1947 Austin 8 Traveller about 15 years ago which has a 800cc side valve engine and is only 23 PS. Then I got a 1968 Morris Traveller with 46 PS and this year a 1970 Triumph Herald rust bucket Cabrio. All very very nice.and not expensive.
Sicher, kann ich fliegen!
I am not a "guy" and I was never a "kid".

keithl

It is actually not that long ago.

My first new car purchase (in 1985 - C Reg) was an 1100cc Fiesta.  The base model (Popular) did not have front headrests or a heated rear screen, so I paid a little more for the next model up (Popular Plus) which had these but still did not have a radio or rear seat belts, which I fitted myself when I could afford them.  It only had a four speed box.
Warning: objects in the mirror may be close than they appear (or I'm creeping up on you from behind)

Michael_Rolls

My Wolseley - 1964 6/110 - had a  three speed box with reverse where first had been on my Anglia. Needed remembering. Now that I have typed that, I think that my memory must be wrong - surely more likely to have been where the Anglia had second? I do know that on one occasion that when a pedestrian tried to commit suicide with my assistance, I selected reverse instead of first to move off afterwards - nerves of 'what might have been' to blame.
Mike
Properly trained, a man can be a dog's best friend

mogman

'63 Morgan 4/4 which I've owned for 50 years, and '65 Anglia 124E 1200 Super

itsme

I remember driving my brothers Morris Minor just after I passed my test. It had an electric fuel pump that used to stick. A rap with a spanner got it going again. I was turning right at some traffic lights and they went red. Green came and I set off, stalled the engine. Wouldnt start. Listened for the tick tick of the pump an nothing. Traffic behind me, so I jumped out, spanner in hand- and knocked the trafficator off... :embarassed:

meharibear

November 30, 2017, 16:30:10 pm #18 Last Edit: November 30, 2017, 16:31:46 pm by meharibear
I liked the turn indicator on this truck I photographed in Australia a few weeks ago - Very simple - no software and no electrics![attachimg=1]  Not sure why it has turned sideways as it is saved here in the upright position!
Inside every old person is a young person wondering what happened.  (Terry Pratchett)

JohnP

Quote from: paulinfrance on November 28, 2017, 18:51:05 pm
Not my first car but maybe I ended up with yours, it snapped in half at the bottom of the windscreen / wheel arches on the Newcastle round about in 1975  :-\


No, different car, slightly different era - similar location though.

Mine had been owned by my aunt in the north of Scotland since new.  She'd given up driving on medical grounds and the car was rotting away in her garage when I went and retrieved it in 1977.  It would most likely have gone directly to the scrappy otherwise.

Much of the maintenance I had to do on it was using s/hand spare parts from the scrappy in Shiremoor (near Newcastle) and I had the car for my 2nd and 3rd years at uni.  I took it to London after I got a job there in September 1979.  That's a story in itself as the clutch jammed at Leicester Forest East services on the M1 and I had to drive the rest of the way to Balham (M1, North Circular, South Circular, A24) on a Sunday afternoon/evening without using the clutch...

I was going to drive the car back up north at Christmas, but by then the rear subframe mounting points (it was already on its second subframe) were rather alarmingly rusted, giving the subframe a certain, independent freedom of movement.  I took the car to the scrapyard in Balham where I exchanged it for a tenner.
Quantum est in fenestra canini ?

paulinfrance

It must had been yours, as shortly after buying it the clutch also went,,,  :D
Mode 2 THE only way to fly

itsme

Quote from: meharibear on November 30, 2017, 16:30:10 pm
I liked the turn indicator on this truck I photographed in Australia a few weeks ago - Very simple - no software and no electrics![attachimg=1]  Not sure why it has turned sideways as it is saved here in the upright position!
That is handy for slapping cyclists around the ear as you pass....

pooh

I managed to fail my driving test whilst driving my Dad's Vauxhall Victor - also a column change with a three-speed box.

Whilst approaching a T junction, I needed to both change down with my left hand, and give a right turn hand signal (remember those ?) with my right hand.

Apparently taking both hands off the steering wheel is considered a fail  :''
Confucious he say "more than one aircraft in the same airspace leads to structural failure"

FlyinBrian

While employed by PO Telephones in the '70s I used a Morris Minor van, one winter morning it would not start so I called the garage, a bloke came out lifted the bonnet and gave the battery terminals a sharp whack with a hammer. It then started fine. A week or so later It would not start again so being handy with a hammer I sorted it myself. This happened irregularly until a couple of months later when the van went in for service, when I went to collect it the garage supervisor wanted to know why the battery terminals were now mushroom shaped! They had to cut off the terminal connectors and solder on new ones, needless to say I had absolutely no idea how the battery had got damaged.
Basic Research is what I do - when I don't know what I'm doing!.

Wal

Remember double declutching? Used to be necessary when changing down on a three gear Morris minor in the early sixties.
If I try to work out now how it was done I wonder how it was done in a fraction of a second!

Gordon W

In 1958 my father bought a 1936 Ford 8 for £35.  It had only 72k miles on the clock and no rust.  DNW 823 - we called it Dinah and I emblazoned the name on the bonnet in waterslide transfers from my aeromodelling stash.  On subsequently visiting Tommy's garage for the cheapest juice, Tom told his son "Fill Dinah up with a gallon of sludge!".  The 2-door version was nicknamed the "£100 Ford" back in '36.  Ours was the deluxe version with 4 doors - that had been termed "the £110 Ford"!  For our summer holiday we set off from our home near Skipton, Yorkshire and went touring bed and breakfast in Cornwall and along the south coast.  It did 100 miles to the pint of oil, so had a gallon of "5 bob a gallon" oil strapped onto the rear luggage carrier - no boot then of course.  Teenage me sat in the back seat surrounded by our luggage. 

Two or three years later Dad sold Dinah for £25 and replaced it with a 1957  E93A Ford Popular.  Exactly the same automotive technology right down to the Girling cable brakes, no heater or radio, 3-speed box with crash bottom gear, and no oil filter, but it did have a boot, and the owner's manual bragged that you could wear a top hat in the back seat of a Popular!  The lack of an oil filter required an oil change every 1000 miles - 5 bob a gallon oil again.  We did a decoke and valve grind.  As the tappets were non-adjustable, Dad would check the valve gaps with a feeler gauge, write the amount that needed grinding off the bottom of the valve stem on masking tape stuck to each valve, and I cycled the 5 miles to the Ford agents with the valves, which would be ground there and then, and I'd cycle back home with them.

As an eager teenage car enthusiast I toured the scrapyards and managed to buy a heater and radio.  The heater had a heat exchanger in the top hose and the engine's cooling fan blew air through this thing which was ducted into the cab.  The radio was a genuine Ford 4-valve effort, made I think by Lear industries who later made the Lear jet, though I could be wrong on that.

Dad taught me to drive in the Pop, and later on, without Dad in the car, I found that whilst double-declutching, once you had the timing and throttling right, you only dabbed the clutch.  It was a short step to not bothering with the clutch at all in changing down to bottom gear.

More Fords came and went in my life: 100E Prefect (rear bumper fell off, McPherson strut mounts needed welding up);  105E Anglia (passenger door felloff); Mk2 Cortina (front struts again); Sierra 1.6 (just a rust-bucket).  Dinah was the only Ford I knew intimately that wasn't a rot-box.

Gordon

Michael_Rolls

On value for money - this would have been about 1960 - a work colleague bought a pre-war Austin 7 for £3 (not a misprint) to take himself, his wife and their two little ones on holiday. From Surrey toured Devon and Cornwall and on the way home the poor little thing expired - about 100 yards from their front door. Unloaded, put an ad in the local paper and sold it as a non-runner for £3-10-0 (£3.50)!
Mike
Properly trained, a man can be a dog's best friend

JohnP

Quote from: Wal on December 03, 2017, 14:48:11 pm
Remember double declutching? Used to be necessary when changing down on a three gear Morris minor in the early sixties.
If I try to work out now how it was done I wonder how it was done in a fraction of a second!


I certainly do,  and if need-be I'm sure I could still do it now.  Not a lot of call for it though on my Avensis with CVT transmission! 

But "back in the day" with the Morris 1100 mentioned earlier in the thread,  double-declutching was needed to change down to 1st.  Not absolutley essential, but very handy when turning in off South Road, Durham to drive up the hill and park in the college car park...
Quantum est in fenestra canini ?

Pup Cam

Quote from: itsme on November 25, 2017, 17:37:00 pm
windows you wind with a handle. Your all soft.


No, no, no Bob - windows that slid along grooves filled with moss and we lived in shoe box in't middle t' of road.
Still distracted by a 1953 AJS 16MS and now a 1939 BSA 250 too!

Michael_Rolls

Double de-clutching - bane of my life with the Anglia which, thankfully, was the only car I ever owned that didn't have synchromesh on all gears.
I remember something else from way back then - I used to have my suits tailor made (until the prices got silly) and at one fitting my tailor advised me that they were bringing in a high quality car coat (remember those?) for just £35 (this would have been in the early 70s, or earlier, so that probably represents over £300 at current day levels!). I smugly informed him that I had no need of such a garment as my car had a very good heater!
Mike
Properly trained, a man can be a dog's best friend

itsme

Quote from: Plain ol' Puppers on December 05, 2017, 21:48:16 pm
No, no, no Bob - windows that slid along grooves filled with moss and we lived in shoe box in't middle t' of road.
I had a minivan that had plants growing in those grooves.

keithl

December 07, 2017, 10:24:58 am #31 Last Edit: December 11, 2017, 10:09:21 am by keithl
My Mum tells a story ...

When they got married, Dad was in the Navy.  Mum's Dad was teaching her to drive, and her car (possibly a BMW Isseta bubble car as I know that she had one before they had children) had new fangled ignition with the starter on second click of the key.  She had applied for her test as she wanted to impress Dad when he came home.  A cancellation test came through whilst Grandad was on holiday so she arranged with a local driving school to take her to the test and use their car, which was a Morris Minor.  Would have been 1961 or 1962.

Of course, the Moggy has turn the key one click then pull a switch out to start.

When the driving instructor picked her up, the car was already running.

She drove to the test centre, turned off the ignition and went in.

Came out with the examiner and he said "now start the car".

She didn't know how.

Failed, without leaving the car park.
Warning: objects in the mirror may be close than they appear (or I'm creeping up on you from behind)

Bad Raven

Quote from: Wal on December 03, 2017, 14:48:11 pm
Remember double declutching? Used to be necessary when changing down on a three gear Morris minor in the early sixties.
If I try to work out now how it was done I wonder how it was done in a fraction of a second!


Having driven LOTS of vehicles in the last decade that had no synchromesh AT ALL, and needed properly timed and executed double de-clutching UP and down the box, the answer must be yes.

Question is, who remembers the "Clutch Stop" device that many heavy commercials had to enable a change up the box to be made before the road speed dropped back so far you had to down change again to get going, and why you needed it?
The user formerly know as Bravedan........... Well if Prince can do it....................

antonnick

December 10, 2017, 19:40:21 pm #33 Last Edit: December 10, 2017, 19:42:23 pm by antonnick
[
Of course, the Moggy has turn the key one click then pull a switch out to start
.

[/quote]

Morris Minor .......now at the end of a nice Restauration and conversion. nice Piece of nostalgia and the models fit inside as well

[attach=1]
Sicher, kann ich fliegen!
I am not a "guy" and I was never a "kid".

itsme

Quote from: antonnick on December 10, 2017, 19:40:21 pm
[
Of course, the Moggy has turn the key one click then pull a switch out to start
.



Morris Minor .......now at the end of a nice Restauration and conversion. nice Piece of nostalgia and the models fit inside as well

[attach=1]
I used to have one, a green one. When I got rid of it (with no MOT) I had two blokes almost fighting to buy it...

lanicopter

My Grandad had one - they were hateful things.

Although not as bad as the Morris Marina he replaced it with.
Current fuel status: "Master Caution"

itsme

Quote from: lanicopter on December 12, 2017, 09:32:43 am
My Grandad had one - they were hateful things.

Although not as bad as the Morris Marina he replaced it with.
The one thing about them was that they were easy starting. If my battery was flat I could start it on a level road by pushing it, juping in an slamming second gear. The slightest bump and it started. The Marina was a pig.

Sent from my SM-A300FU using Tapatalk


Michael_Rolls

December 12, 2017, 12:31:58 pm #37 Last Edit: December 12, 2017, 12:33:14 pm by Michael_Rolls
There was nothing wrong with the Marina that NOT owning one wouldn't cure - says smug me!
Mike (the smugness was caused by having hired one for a couple of days - felt much better when I gave it back!)
Properly trained, a man can be a dog's best friend

miniflight

Quote from: Michael_Rolls on December 12, 2017, 12:31:58 pm
There was nothing wrong with the Marina that NOT owning one wouldn't cure - says smug me!
Mike (the smugness was caused by having hired one for a couple of days - felt much better when I gave it back!)



I had two marinas (company cars!) and they both dripped water on to your right foot when it rained, which made it difficult to appear presentable at the end of a journey !

Bad Raven

There was a period where the business wanted us to use Hire Cars, any group C from four hirers. I dropped one when they pushed a Marina on me. TBH the Montego wasn't that much better either, but the Marina was the worst thing I ever was asked to drive apart from the Hillman Hunter and the Vauxhall HA van.

On Minors, I have driven quite a few vans, Red, Red and White "Engineering" striped, Olive Green and Yellow, but never a car or woody. 

I did a few events inc the HCVC run in the last Minor the PO ever bought (Yellow, Telephones), which was complete with the full set of tools and consumables it carried in service. (And yes I did have fun with the fuel pump as it stood around a lot!!). One day I was getting it ready for a trip inside the Museum a woman game over and it became instantly clear she thought I and the van were current BT!!! !! !!
The user formerly know as Bravedan........... Well if Prince can do it....................

martinw

When I used to work for a bus company we had Marina vans as hack transport. I remember taking one around a roundabout and as I steered it round to the right the nearside door flew wide open, came as a surprise to the passenger sitting there...