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November 16, 2019, 23:31:43 pm

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Servo mounting plates. Marine Ply?

Started by e-flite_rules, July 31, 2019, 19:43:21 pm

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e-flite_rules

Need some assistance please!

I'm looking to add some servo mounting plates onto some EPP/EPO planes so that I mount my servos using screws into the mounting plates.  Rather than gluing the servos in.

In the past I'd have used "marine ply" as a high quality material that wouldn't split when a screw was driven into it.  However it seems that no model shop sells that any longer.

So what material do you experts recommend?  Needs to take a #1 woodscrew or self tapper.  I'd re-enforce the thread using cyano.

Suggestions please!

Thanks.

C

pheasant_plucker

I usually just use liteply with liteply doublers where the screws go in.
I have never had a servo pull the screws out in the last 40 years even after a subterranean landing :''

Gerry
Senior Administrator

The man serving me in the canteen said "Look, You can see the face of Jesus in the Margarine" The Asian guy next to me replied "I can't believe it's not Budda"

leckyBB

Quote from: pheasant_plucker on July 31, 2019, 19:48:16 pmI usually just use liteply with liteply doublers where the screws go in.
I have never had a servo pull the screws out in the last 40 years even after a subterranean landing :''

Gerry
Same method for me Gerry. I used to use aircraft grade 1/16" ply as I was able to gather up all the off cuts where I worked at weekends on vintage restoration projects.All gone now though since it has been more than 10 years since I retired.
Life is not measured by the breaths you take, but by the moments that take your breath away.

British Victory

If you must use ly, visit slecuk.co.uk theres birch ly there which is every bit as good as the marine stuff
there's only one f in RCMF,
               John

paulinfrance

I still use 'bio' fruit boxes, from gliders to 20cc petrol's for servo fixing,, cheap ply.jpg
Mode 2 THE only way to fly

British Victory

Quote from: paulinfrance on August 01, 2019, 07:50:05 amI still use 'bio' fruit boxes, from gliders to 20cc petrol's for servo fixing,, cheap ply.jpg
How the hell do you get them in the fuselage  :ev
there's only one f in RCMF,
               John

paulinfrance

Mode 2 THE only way to fly

rbp28668

Must be bloody big servos if you need a box that size....
Bruce Porteous

paulinfrance

Quote from: rbp28668 on September 03, 2019, 20:46:35 pmMust be bloody big servos if you need a box that size....

I can't afford servos on my pension, $%&  so it's going to be control line when my wife
has finished using the washing line,, :co
Mode 2 THE only way to fly

OakleyMos

Nothing wrong with the control line! haha

e-flite_rules

Seriously though does anyone know where to buy "marine ply".  That's what we used to call it in my youth - 40 years ago!  No idea what its modern day title is.  Can't really describe it objectively.  However subjectively it just looked absolutely top quality.

itsme

Model shops, Slec, Gliders, Leeds etc should stock quality marine ply. Its not cheap. But really, for your usage of it as servo mounts, any ply will do. Put a doubler where the screws go, and pilot the holes with a 1/16" drill. They wont split then and certainly will not pull out. Marine ply is simply 5 or 7 ply, with WBP (water and boil proof) glue. Best from birch.

paulinfrance

It's nearly impossible to buy it in France, they sell you CTBE

exterior grade ply, :-\  telling you that it is Marine ply ( robbing buggers :-X  )it's much lighter and 2 less ply's, it falls to pieces if used outside in a couple of years,,  :''
Mode 2 THE only way to fly

British Victory

Where ever possible I used two laminations of 12mm x 3mm bass wood from slec, I think it's OTT especially when you see it attached to 5mm square balsa longerons on some of the old timers I fly. Chris Foss, in his wot 4 and acrowot kits provides a 3mm liteply base for attaching the servos, I think doublers are supplied or it just may have been me over egging the omelet.
I always put a drop of cyno down the drilled holes to harden it up for the servo screws no matter what I use.
Sorry this is months behind your post.
Slec also sell birchply which is way OTT in 6mm thickness but if it makes you happy.
there's only one f in RCMF,
               John

itsme

November 04, 2019, 11:55:17 am #14 Last Edit: November 04, 2019, 11:57:46 am by itsme
Its really about the wood used. Marine ply uses water resistant hardwoods. Have a look- https://www.famitchell.com.au/marine-plywood-made/

British Victory

I thought marine ply used water resistant adhesives, even lignum vitae absorbs water, at least it did in the stern tubes of the tankers I sailed on. It's reckoned to be almost impermeable iirc it doesn't even float.
FWIW BS 1088 is the Compliancy standard applied by LRS for "marine ply".
there's only one f in RCMF,
               John

itsme

Quote from: British Victory on November 04, 2019, 12:14:22 pmI thought marine ply used water resistant adhesives, even lignum vitae absorbs water, at least it did in the stern tubes of the tankers I sailed on. It's reckoned to be almost impermeable iirc it doesn't even float.
FWIW BS 1088 is the Compliancy standard applied by LRS for "marine ply".

They use phenolic resin for the glue. It is waterproof. Tropical hardwoods are used, in this day and age they are not the rarer forms of hardwood. A modern high water resistant wood is known as Ekki.

paulinfrance

I don't see the point in marine ply, :-\  I mostly use rubbish ply ( 2 x 3mm ) from vegetable crates and as above a drip of cyano or wood glue in the screw holes,  :study:
more than enough for a 5kg 20cc powered plane, but I do 'occasionally' use Birch 'aircraft' ply (model shops ) also 2 x 3mm thick.
Mode 2 THE only way to fly

PDR

Quote from: British Victory on November 04, 2019, 12:14:22 pmI thought marine ply used water resistant adhesives, even lignum vitae absorbs water, at least it did in the stern tubes of the tankers I sailed on.

In this context the term "Water Resistant Hardwood" means "Will not deteriorate after long exposure to water", not "will not absorb water". These woods will absorb water, but retain most of their structural properties when wet.

PDR
There are no shortcuts on the long, hard road to success. But if your dad's rich there could a limo service...

itsme

I believe there are piers in the Thames hundreds of years old. Think the wood was cedar.

PDR

The piers next to the thames are also hundreds of years old - they are made from in-bred aristocracy.

PDR
There are no shortcuts on the long, hard road to success. But if your dad's rich there could a limo service...

mart49

My recollection about BS1088 marine ply from building dinghies many years ago was that the wood and glue had to withstand boiling in water for 72 hours without significant deterioration. A bit of overkill in a model plane I guess; unless of course you subject your models to some pretty extreme treatment!

paulinfrance

I also built boats and dinghy's but I didn't use much ply on them,,

mainly the thwarts,, and the only thing that kept them falling apart was the varnish,,
Mode 2 THE only way to fly

The Saint. (Owen)

Quote from: itsme on November 04, 2019, 15:51:53 pmI believe there are piers in the Thames hundreds of years old. Think the wood was cedar.

Salt water doesn't cause wood to rot, (or it might but very slowly) but on the other hand, fresh water will cause wood to rot within months. ;)
Electrickery is the work of the devil.
Proper aeroplanes are powered by engines.

paulinfrance

 ::) This post is becoming a load of rot, and it isn't even in the water,,,
Mode 2 THE only way to fly

itsme

Quote from: mart49 on November 04, 2019, 17:14:18 pmMy recollection about BS1088 marine ply from building dinghies many years ago was that the wood and glue had to withstand boiling in water for 72 hours without significant deterioration. A bit of overkill in a model plane I guess; unless of course you subject your models to some pretty extreme treatment!
Thats WBP - water and boil proof.

pooh

Quote from: PDR on November 04, 2019, 16:58:09 pmThe piers next to the thames are also hundreds of years old - they are made from in-bred aristocracy.

PDR

"peers"?
Confucious he say "more than one aircraft in the same airspace leads to structural failure"

PDR

November 05, 2019, 11:48:18 am #27 Last Edit: November 05, 2019, 11:50:13 am by PDR
Quote from: pooh on November 05, 2019, 09:47:51 am"peers"?

Picky, picky...

:)

OK then - the Piers near the Thames is 54 years old and has an imprint of Jeremy Clarkson's fist in the middle of its face.

PDR
There are no shortcuts on the long, hard road to success. But if your dad's rich there could a limo service...

paulinfrance

Mode 2 THE only way to fly

PDR

He's the quizmaster in "Who Wants To Be A Millionaire".

PDR
There are no shortcuts on the long, hard road to success. But if your dad's rich there could a limo service...

paulinfrance

Mode 2 THE only way to fly

itsme

he was on some boy racer programme too.

PDR

Quote from: itsme on November 05, 2019, 17:05:59 pmhe was on some boy racer programme too.

Well yes, but I don't think anyone watched it - it was on BBC2, which is hardly mainstream is it...

PDR
There are no shortcuts on the long, hard road to success. But if your dad's rich there could a limo service...

itsme

Actually just watched him on a re run of QI. He looked drawn and tired. Has he found a woman?

The Saint. (Owen)

I watched only one Top Gear show since Clarkson was fired, and I've never seen it since, it's just not the same anymore.  :-\  :-\
Electrickery is the work of the devil.
Proper aeroplanes are powered by engines.

itsme

Quote from: PDR on November 05, 2019, 17:28:32 pmWell yes, but I don't think anyone watched it - it was on BBC2, which is hardly mainstream is it...

PDR
not like Dave, then...

pooh

Quote from: PDR on November 05, 2019, 11:48:18 amPicky, picky...

:)

OK then - the Piers near the Thames is 54 years old and has an imprint of Jeremy Clarkson's fist in the middle of its face.

PDR

sounds like a sports car?
Confucious he say "more than one aircraft in the same airspace leads to structural failure"