December 14, 2019, 07:14:51 am

RCMF Donations

Enjoy using RCMF? How about a wee donation to help us keep you in the style to which you've become accustomed?

Welcome to RCMF. Please login or sign up.

December 14, 2019, 07:14:51 am

Login with username, password and session length

Model Rocketry

Started by PDR, December 04, 2019, 22:26:03 pm

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

PDR

I have an american colleague who is currently seconded over here for a few years. She's an engineer, and when she was a kid in Texas she was into rockets. She now has a 12-year-old son and she'd like to give him a go at some rocketry. She asked me what the legal situation is with rockets over here and I have to admit I don't know.

So can anyone tell me what the rules are about flying model rockets in the UK? Are there limits on where, or is it just a matter of being somewhere "safe" and with the land-owner's permission, or what?

PDR
There are no shortcuts on the long, hard road to success. But if your dad's rich there could a limo service...

FrankS

It's actually covered in the BMFA handbook, section 19.20 Space models.

Also worth checking here http://www.ukra.org.uk/

clive_f

FYI most starter stuff available in the UK  is from the Estes brand , which i am sure she will be familiar with from the USA.

However  I have NEVER got one to fire successfully.

Despite good battery voltage .
Brand new motors and igniters , tried on the day of purchase.
Modified match igniters as per tinternet  as the std ones are claimed to be very poor.

I wish her much more success than i have had.
If she is successful perhaps she could give me some pointers on how to get it right. I would dearly love to see the one i have got actually fly.

Regards  Clive

paulinfrance

Quote from: clive_f on December 05, 2019, 11:12:33 amFYI most starter stuff available in the UK  is from the Estes brand , which i am sure she will be familiar with from the USA.

However  I have NEVER got one to fire successfully.

Despite good battery voltage .
Brand new motors and igniters , tried on the day of purchase.
Modified match igniters as per tinternet  as the std ones are claimed to be very poor.

I wish her much more success than i have had.
If she is successful perhaps she could give me some pointers on how to get it right. I would dearly love to see the one i have got actually fly.

Regards  Clive

 I sold them for years, never any trouble at all from the rockets, from the one that took a photo, one that launched a glider, to the Saturn 5,,, etc
Mode 2 THE only way to fly

meharibear

The UK model rocketry guru is Stuart Lodge - Also well respected International judge in this field.  You can contact him via Aeromodller using editor@aeromodeller.com
Inside every old person is a young person wondering what happened.  (Terry Pratchett)

FrankS

Yep, a few years back now, but my son and I used to build and fly ESTES rockets, rarely had a misfire. Good fun, if a little expensive per launch.

We even built the RC canard rocket glider and the swing wing F-14.

itsme

We tried a few experiments as kids in the fifties, with balsa and doped tissue 'rocket ships' based on Dan Dare, powered with firework rockets. Never really successful but we didnt actually burn anywhere down...

pooh

Quote from: itsme on December 06, 2019, 08:38:56 amWe tried a few experiments as kids in the fifties, with balsa and doped tissue 'rocket ships' based on Dan Dare, powered with firework rockets. Never really successful but we didnt actually burn anywhere down...

reminds me of the small Keil Kraft free-flight plane I built. It was powered by a small Jetex motor. I used to launch such planes from the top of one side of a valley, so they had agood flight if well-trimmed. I accidentally lit the fuselage whilst lighting the Jetex fuse - it was going to burn up, being made of balsa and doped tissue, so I launched it on its final Viking-style funeral flight to Valhalle...
Confucious he say "more than one aircraft in the same airspace leads to structural failure"

paulinfrance

Our free flight Jetex powered planes flew into the wild yonder never to be seen again,,, :D
Mode 2 THE only way to fly

leckyBB

We had some success with Jetex free flight but often lost them either OOS or by conflagration.
Our best efforts were own design spaceship type models with paperclip hooks and run along a very long length of monofilament line stretched up a friends garden on a slight upward incline. On release they would whoosh up to the end of the line just as the Jetex 50 motor expired. Then with a jiggle they would slide back down to our launch point ready for another run.
Life is not measured by the breaths you take, but by the moments that take your breath away.

itsme

oh, we never got a second chance with the rocket powered ones....all that was ever left was a pile of ashes. How we never burned down the North East is beyond me...

paulinfrance

Quote from: leckyBB on December 06, 2019, 20:40:10 pmWe had some success with Jetex free flight but often lost them either OOS or by conflagration.
Our best efforts were own design spaceship type models with paperclip hooks and run along a very long length of monofilament line stretched up a friends garden on a slight upward incline. On release they would whoosh up to the end of the line just as the Jetex 50 motor expired. Then with a jiggle they would slide back down to our launch point ready for another run.

One screwed to a coal wagon on Dads loft railway was a good way to Knock tiles off of the roof, :D ,
Mode 2 THE only way to fly

pooh

Quote from: leckyBB on December 06, 2019, 20:40:10 pmWe had some success with Jetex free flight but often lost them either OOS or by conflagration.
Our best efforts were own design spaceship type models with paperclip hooks and run along a very long length of monofilament line stretched up a friends garden on a slight upward incline.

another parallel -

a pal and I both had a "Bantam" 0.5cc glowplug engine, so we made little "trolleys" with Meccano, suspending the Bantams below a string spanning about 100feet between a convenient tree and a rose archway down the middle of the garden.

We started the engine and let the trolley go, which then charged off along the string. The end-stop was a short string tied to the support string and the side of the roase arch, so forming a "vee".

Must have driven the neighbours mad!!

The end-stop eventually killed the engines as the trolleys would swing upwards and the prop wrapped the string around it and the main prop shaft, slowly pulling the crankshaft outwards until things went badly wrong inside the engine...
Confucious he say "more than one aircraft in the same airspace leads to structural failure"