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Electricky Help

Started by bugs, January 22, 2020, 17:40:28 pm

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bugs

Help please before I throw my toys out of the pram  :ev . Got a new 80A ESC & I'm trying to solder the 2 battery connect wires to an XT60 connector. Man at the shop said just get the pre-soldered wire ends hot until the solder is shiny & runny then quickly put on slots on XT60 Great but just how do you get the ESC wires hot enough to melt the solder....what spec of soldering iron do you need. I've done this OK with a 60A ESC with my soldering iron but the mass of wire on the 80A just conducts the heat away. Using 100W soldering iron gun & my son's Weller but no luck......Advice please (I've thought of just go back to IC already)  $%&

itsme

a 60 watt should do it. With XT60 I plug a male and female together so it does not distort with the heat, hold it in a small vice and tin the contacts, then tin the wires, hold together and a touch of the iron should do it. Use cored solder.

rjm

Check what solder you are using. Lead or lead free. I think the batteries come lead free. I cut the existing ends off and use lead solder which has a lower melting point.
       John Miller.

Saxon


Soldering those is hard to describe.
Look on youtube.
The one below is quite long but will steer you in the right direction.

https://www.google.com/search?q=soldering+xt60&oq=soldering+xt60&aqs=chrome..69i57j69i61l3.18298j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8#kpvalbx=_rLUoXsuoEb2FhbIP7ZmyiAc20

Oh and don't forget to slip the shrink tube on the cable before you start to solder.

John

Saxon


I forgot. Use leaded solder as suggested by John Miller and add a touch of flux.

John

Chippie

Do not use the flux used by plumbers that is acidic...it will corrode the wiring if all traces are not removed...
Suggest you get some electrical flux if you need to..
Eccentric millionaire Financed by 'er indoors'
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bugs

Sorted :)  jammed ESC lead in TX60 connector socket, put loads of electrician's flux over it, got iron hot, held it just above and melted cored solder so it ran down over joint. V firmly attached  :uk: Thanks for comments and advice!

dickw

Quote from: bugs on January 22, 2020, 22:19:20 pmSorted :)  jammed ESC lead in TX60 connector socket, put loads of electrician's flux over it, got iron hot, held it just above and melted cored solder so it ran down over joint. V firmly attached  :uk: Thanks for comments and advice!

I am a bit worried about that. It sounds like you dripped melted solder onto the joint rather than heating the connector/wire joint. Please tell me I missunderstood.

Dick
Grow old disgracefully

bugs

I did both, held soldering iron tip on wire & ran molten solder into the joint, did all round the joint. The pre-soldered wire on the 80A ESC was impossible to melt, see comments about cutting the end off. I gave it a very good stress test of trying to pull it apart when I'd finished!

dickw

Grow old disgracefully

PDR

From the sounds of it it's not the wattage of the iron that's the problem - it's the size of the bit. The bit is too small and so can't hold enough energy to warm up  the work. You need an iron with a much larger bit. the cable on an 80A controller should probably be 10AWG, which is equivilent to 2.6mm dia copper rod. You need to transfer enough head into it to get it up to ~270degC, and that heat is stored in the copper of the bit. So get a bigger iron, not a more powerful one (or alternatively a professional temperature-controlled one which simulates extra capacity by turning the heater back on, but they're expensive).

I always used to think size didn't matter, but then all my new wallpaper peeled off...

PDR
There are no shortcuts on the long, hard road to success. But if your dad's rich there could a limo service...

paulinfrance

If you don't mind fiddling about, a heater plug ( 12v ) from a diesel engine with a bit of brass on the end,,
Mode 2 THE only way to fly

pooh

I'll second the PDR wisdom - I read the first and subsequent posts but didn't comment.

On a commercial basis I use 50 watt temperature-controlled irons with bits to suit the job - I can go from soldering surface-mount devices with pin spacing of 1.25mm, so the pins are around 0.7mm, to 2.5sq mm cables with the same iron - I've even done a bit of tinplate soldering with them. The bit tips range from 0.5mm diameter through to about 6mm diameter. I also have a 100watt iron with a 20 x 5mm tip - that handles almost anything else I need to solder - then there's the blowtorch!

Usual working temperature 330C. As a general rule it is a case of "get in quick, get out quick" so a high temperature, high thermal mass means the joint heats up quickly, the solder melts and flows, then immediately remove the heat source. That way the pulse of heat is short and hopefully the thermal mass of the component flattens out the peak temperature to a safe level - most electronic components are heat sensitive to some extent. With wires and connectors, only the insulation and housing are in any way heat sensitive, worst case they distort, whilst electronic components die. Slowly heating the assembly with an inadequate temperature and thermal mass is likely to make a rubbish joint and wreck the components.

As for solder, anything from 0.7mm up to 2mm diameter, always with flux cores (never liquid or paste flux, except at the tinplate level)

PS you can do wallpapering with a computer, you just use ctrl-c followed by ctrl-v
Confucious he say "more than one aircraft in the same airspace leads to structural failure"

Chippie

You can never have too much heat....
SMD components to esc leads....no problem..
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