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Frsky Horus X10s Express

Started by PDR, April 30, 2020, 10:02:07 am

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PDR

As we're locked down and unable to fly for a while I'm considering taking the opportunity to do an RC technology refresh. My current system is a 15 year old Multiplex Evo with a switchable DSMX/DSM2 module which works fine, but I'm very conscious that it's obsolescent and unsupportable these days so if anything breaks I could be stuffed. On the other hand I want something with software that is at least as good, and I don't want to be locked into expensive receivers (ideally I want to be able to carry on using my largish stock of orange DSM2/DSMX receivers).

So I'm looking at the Horus X10s Express, running OpenTx, and with a Jumper multi-protocol module in the module bay. It looks like an impressive package for the price that would potentially end up as a 40+ channel set with superb software, but I wondered if anyone had any experience of the transmitter itself?

Any comments?

PDR
There are no shortcuts on the long, hard road to success. But if your dad's rich there could a limo service...

paulinfrance

April 30, 2020, 11:54:52 am #1 Last Edit: November 08, 2020, 12:13:35 pm by pheasant_plucker
Maybe with the never ending lockdown you might get through these,,

reveiws+Horus+X10s+Express
Mode 2 THE only way to fly

RobC

I've got a Taranis X9D and a Horus X12 but they're both older models that just run ACCST not the newer Access protocol so I'm limited to 16 channels.  I've used 13 on one model by really trying but I haven't managed all 16 yet.
The good thing about OpenTX is that it's written and maintained by enthusiasts, if you can think of a function it will do it.
The bad thing about OpenTX is that it's written and maintained by enthusiasts, so it's constantly evolving with the inevitable bugs turning up in initial releases of new versions.
I understand Mx users find it easy to get to grips with it, as an ex-Futaba user I had to learn hill climbing. Now I've got the hang of it there's not a lot that I can't make work and if I do get stuck there's a huge community on RCGroups to get help from.
The hardware is pretty good these days with a good range of receivers and of course the cheap telemetry sensors.
I've just fitted a Jumper 4in1 module to play with one of these helicopter devices.  Plugged it in, created a new model in Opentx choosing 'external rf' and 'diy multimodule', this gave a drop down to select DSM and DSM2/DSMX, choose bind and it bound to the AS3X in the little Blade chopper straight away.
So far, so good!
flying's easy - it's getting it back down in one piece that's the hard part

fokker

I fly with an x10s the non express version. No issues in 2 years of use. I hung back a bit installing open tx but haven't looked back since. The pre installed fros is ok but open is far better.Receivers are a sensible price with a vario receiver being less than £40. Plenty of how tos on you tube. As regards people messing with the open software stick to the official releases and don't use nightly builds or anything that's been modified.

PDR

Well the debit card took hits of around £550 last week - £400 for the X10s Express,£36 for the Jumper multi-protocol module and the rest for associated bits & bobs. As most of my fleet currently have Trump-coloured DSM2/DSMX receivers I will mainly be using the DSM* output from the module rather than a wholesale Rx replacement, but I've bought a couple of small FrSky receivers to use as telemetry hubs (together with a pair of LiPo cell-voltage sensors to use as electric fuel gauges). This will be exploiting the almost unique ability of the Taranis/Horus range to use both the internal FrSky module and the external module simultaneously*.

The stuff arrives on Monday, so at some point after that I'll be re-flashing it to OpenTx - I've read the instructions and it seems quite straightforward.  Then I just have to learn a new programming system...

PDR

* If I ever get back into larger models again I intend to exploit this as a safety-diversity thing. The idea would be to use a DSMX receiver and a FrSky receiver in the aeroplane, with (say) the servos for left aileron, left elevator and rudder connected to the DSMX receiver, while those for the right aileron, right elevator and throttle would be connected to the other, with each Rx running from its own battery. I think that's as far down the redundancy path as I can go with stock equipment.
There are no shortcuts on the long, hard road to success. But if your dad's rich there could a limo service...

FrankS

Have got a couple of club mates who've gone from mainstream radios to Taranis, they have struggled a bit with Open Tx, being a MPX user (Royal Pro & Profi) I'm interested to learn how you find the transition.

PDR

There are no shortcuts on the long, hard road to success. But if your dad's rich there could a limo service...

Ville

May 03, 2020, 22:17:01 pm #7 Last Edit: May 04, 2020, 11:05:41 am by Ville Reason: Adding info!
Quote from: FrankS on May 03, 2020, 16:32:09 pmHave got a couple of club mates who've gone from mainstream radios to Taranis, they have struggled a bit with Open Tx, being a MPX user (Royal Pro & Profi) I'm interested to learn how you find the transition.

Quote from: PDR on May 03, 2020, 17:21:41 pm#me2

PDR

I'm waiting at the maze exit, don't be late for the flying season ...

ps.
I have hiked the FrSky road but it was too bumpy. Have now started the hike on the Flysky Paladin PL18 road and it feels good. Very solid and nice transmitter. The programming is simple and relatively smooth. The range of receivers that fall into the F5J class is still thin, but it will certainly get better over time.

/Ville  :)
I know what I know and I do what I can

frank

Started using Frsky gear years ago when their first modules came out, ran the Frsky ACCST module in a futaba 9C with total reliability until a couple of years ago when the old girl had a gimbal disintegrate !

Decided to  go for one of the then new Taranis QX7s, which was excellent even with a very steep OpenTX learning curve, but try as I might I could not get on with shape of the TX, the sticks felt like they were in the wrong position on the tranny for me as a mode 1 thumbs flyer.

My next two Frsky products came in quick succession I sold the QX7 and purchased an X9DSE with hall effect gimbals, followed very quickly by the additional purchase of the Horus X12S. Just loved the look of the X12S with all of it's toys!! Unfortunately the thing was just too big and heavy, so that went as well !

This has left me with the X9DSE which I love to bits, it sits in my hands well and feels like a proper tranny (read old Style) and this is the reason I have resisted the temptation to try a Horus X10, it looks like a bit of a larger style of the QX7.

This I have found is one of the problems with Frsky txs, you can't just pop into a shop and handle one to get the feel of it. The only X12S I have seen in the flesh was the one I owned, would love to see how The X10 feels, but I am the only flyer in the club that uses Frsky anyway and you don't even see them at the shows... If there were any this year !

Sorry to ramble on a bit, but for years I was a loyal Futaba user, with the advent of 2.4ghz the futaba gear has become very expensive and I have never fully trusted Spectrum.
It's probably 10 years that I have been using Frsky ACCST radio link without issue.

One thing I have so far resisted is going over to Frsky's new ACCESS protocol as I still have a number of RX's on D8 which is not compatible with this new system.

PDR

Well the new toys arrived today - all the FrSky stuff from T9 plus the multi-protocol module from Quadcopters UK.

Obviously the Tx is the most interesting bit for now, and I'm reasonably impressed. For a £400 Tx it seems to have a lot of stuff. It has all-metal hall-effect gimbals with a gazillion and six ballraces per axis, a very bright high-res colour display, six three-position switches, one two-position toggle switch, one two-position momentary switch, two side-mounted rotary "sliders", one rotary knob with a centre "pip" and one without, and a six-position rotary switch. There are digital trims for the four main channels, plus two other digital trim buttons which are for those rotary sliders (a nice touch). I *think* you can assign all the trim switches to other functions if you wish (shades of the old Profi 4000). There are also three antennas (two internal, one external) plus built-in bluetooth, a mini-USB port, an SD card slot and a "smart port" slot which is actually used to programme FrSky receivers and telemetry sensors - this uses a standard servo plug. But you can look up all the specs in the adverts, so I'm not going to say any more about that except to say that it does seem a lot for the money and the package includes a nice hard carrying case with shaped foam lining.

In this picture it has a balance-bar which T9 sell to go with it. How well it balances on the neckstrap depends on which of the battery options you go for. As standard it doesn't include a battery - I suspect this makes shipping easier. The battery bay can accept a range of LiIon or LiPo options, but the recommended approach is to fit a pair of cylindrical 18650-format LiIon cells in the battery box. I know there will be a debate about spring contacts, but most of what is written on this topic is (IMHO) twaddle. The spring contacts here are more than adequately engineered. I'm not going to engage in any discussion on this subject here. In my case I ordered the 3600mSh 18650 cells, which is as large as you can go with reputable cells (don't buy 18650 cells from unknown sources - there's a lot of fake ones out there). The battery bay has built-in temperature sensors to control charging and the built-in charger is a single-cell (balance) charger. More on that in a minute.

Next to the display are the programming/settings controls. On the left there are four switches around the edge of the circle and a fifth in the middle, while on the right there is a central button surrounded by a scroll wheel. They all feel easy and intuitive to use, but there is hidden complexity in that in OpenTx (more in a minute) all the buttons have short-press and long-press functions. There is stuff that needs to be learned from the manual which can be downloaded from the web, but T9 offer it in a spring-bound hard-copy properly printed on heavy paper for £12. People like me who went to school in the early Paleozoic Era prefer hard-copy, and I recommend spending the money on this.

The Tx has a very solid feel - it's not cheap plastic and has a lot of machined/cast metal parts in the casing. There's also some nice soft elastomer grippy panels on the side which make it comfortable to hold, and it's big enough for grown-ups to use. Here it is side-by-side with my Multiplex Royal Evo - as you can see it's almost the same size, but it's significantly heavier and sturdier:

1.jpg

I mentioned that I also bought the multi-protocol module. I bought the versi9on with no external switches because the OpenTx software talks to it directly, so all the set-up is done in the same ways as for the internal electronics. Geeks will love the way this module has its own mini-usb port through which you can change its internal firmware if it doesn't cover all the ones you want. But as supplied it covers DSM2, DSMX, Futaba, FlySky, numerous chinese drone protocols and many more. It fits neatly in the bay on the back of the Tx, and its antenna can be stowed behind the carrying handle when not it use:

3.jpg
4.jpg

In this picture you can also see the charging lead. As I said, this Tx has a built-in balance charger. The charging arrangements have gone through various iterations over the last year. The original prototypes needed the batteries to be removed for charging, but the first production standard had a USB-C socket on the bottom-left corner of the Tx. But it wasn't a USB-C PORT - it was a port for a specially made external charging module which had a socket for a 12v wall-wart (supplied in the box). This was a bit of a faff, and the current [sic] version charges through the Mini-USB port in the middle of the back of the Tx (as above). This socket takes 5volts (stepped up internally in the charger) and so it CAN be plugged into a stock USB supply (either a standard USB charger or the power USB socket of a laptop/PC/etc. It draws about an amp, so the Tx takes up to 8 hours to fully charge (it takes 2 amps in for every amp that goes to the battery because of that voltage step-up) depending on the size of batteries you fit. In the box they include a Mini-USB to USB cable for charging and connecting to a PC, but they don't supply the wall-wart to actually plug into the mains (any USB charger will do - you almost certainly already have one).

A confession - the cable they supply is not the cable in the photos above. The one they supply is a straight connector, which means you have to stand the TX on a firm level surface to avoid risking damaging the socket by resting on the plug. I happened to have a right-angle mini-USB cable because they came with old-style TomTom sat-navs. Looking around they seem to be like rocking horse shoes as Mini-USB is a rather old standard. Make a note of that - this is MINI-usb, not MICRO-usb as used on phones last year or USB-C as used on phones now. I assume they chose it because it's more robust or something - it's a sturdier connector than either of the others.

So I put it on charge ready for step 2 - the software...

PDR
There are no shortcuts on the long, hard road to success. But if your dad's rich there could a limo service...

PDR

As supplied this Tx comes with the FrSky-simplified version of OpenTx called FrSky Operating System (FROS) which is probably more than adequate for >90 of model flyers' needs. If that includes you then all you need to do is get a micro-SD card (up to 32Gb, class 10) to store model memories and any other settings you want to play with. The SD card simply plugs into the slot in the base of the Tx and that's it - you're done. You can backup and restore the model memories and settings and do other stuff by just plugging the USB lead into a PC with the Tx switched on and just copying files around. Actually this slot is one of the bits I'm not so keen on - I'd have preferred it to be under some sort of cover, but you can't have everything.

But to get the real Good Stuff(tm) from a FrSky Tx you want to use OpenTx - the alternative firmware developed and supported by a user-community. OpenTx has lots of wonderful features which you can read about elsewhere - suffice to say that it's the on;ly transmitter software I've seen which finally beat the old Profi 4000 - and it's beaten it by a long way. But installing it is a little involved. This Tx has two memory "stores". It has the micro-SD card and it has internal flash memory. The transmitter software runs from the internal flash memory, using the SD card for data (model memories, settings, logs etc). To put OpenTx on the transmitter you have to re-flash this internal memory with OpenTx.

The process involves a very useful piece of software called "OpenTx Companion" which also provides data backup functions and allows you to create model memories on the PC and only load them into the Tx when you're finished (much easier than doing it on the Tx itself) - it even has an emulator so you can try out all those complex mixer functions to confirm they do the right things. And of course Open Tx provides the facility to re-flash the Tx software with updates or complete replacements. There is nothing especially difficult about the re-flashing operation, but people should be aware that if they get a step wrong it is vaguely possible to "brick" the transmitter so that it does nothing at all. Fortunately the OpenTx community have provided step-by-step guides to lead you through the process, which takes about 20 mins if you're careful. If you follow the guides and don't think you know better then it just works. They recommend that you also take a backup of the FROS software before you start, because there may be situations when you need to put it back on the Tx again, but that takes only a couple of minutes.

I'm not going to detail the process because its fully documented in the guides published on the website you download the OpenTx software from and I'd probably miss a step re-typing it. But I will say that it was simple enough to do, and when you've done it the start-up splash-screen changes to this:

2.jpg

I'd love to show photos of other screens, but they display is bright and the camera in my phone can't hack the contrast - even that splash screen looks blury.  Once I'd done this it only took five minutes to program my first model - a standard 3-servo indoor Su26 run from the external module set to DSM2. Coming from a Multiplex background it was easy to pick up the basics quite quickly, only referring to the manual for some terminology. In doing so I've started to lift the lid on the available complexities with things like global variables and logic switches, and looking at the mixer options has me champing at the bit to start using them!

One initial observation is about the switches which are almost all three-way. I'm used to having 2-setting rate switches, but it looks like I'm going to move to triple rates by default. Another final observation (before I hit the sack) - I noticed that the Tx can use telemetry data as inputs to controls, logic switches and mixers. THAT opens a door to some interesting options!

PDR
There are no shortcuts on the long, hard road to success. But if your dad's rich there could a limo service...

PDR

Two minor updates to last night's splurge (it was getting late and I still had the latest episode of Killing Eve to watch*):

1. I get a "RTC Battery Low" warning which I think is real because the Tx also won't keep its time and date settings. I gather it's a CR1220 (not a size I keep) and it's located UNDERNEATH the main PCB - what genius came up with that idea!! When I get another battery I'll take the board out and change it.

2. I have the Jumper serial-only (no external switches) multi-protocol module, which seems to be a nice piece of kit. So I dropped it into the bay and went to set up my first model - a 3-servo indoor Su26. I selected the external module, set it to DSM2 and tried to bind the Rx, but it failed. This had me scratching my head for a while until the penny dropped. When selecting the module protocol you first have to select "Multi" and then select DSM2 as the SUB-protocol, checking the auto-detect box to allow the module and the Rx to negotiate the frame rate. The "DSM2" main protocol setting is used to fit an actual Spectrum DSM2 module (as fitted to older JR transmitters). Once I corrected this it bound and worked perfectly.

PDR

* It's a series which makes the viewer empathise with a psychotic serial killer - it should be mandatory viewing to ensure our kids grow up with robust mental attitudes...
There are no shortcuts on the long, hard road to success. But if your dad's rich there could a limo service...

frank

May 05, 2020, 17:37:41 pm #12 Last Edit: May 05, 2020, 17:41:10 pm by frank
"1. I get a "RTC Battery Low" warning which I think is real because the Tx also won't keep its time and date settings. I gather it's a CR1220 (not a size I keep) and it's located UNDERNEATH the main PCB - what genius came up with that idea!! When I get another battery I'll take the board out and change it."

Had the same thing happen on my X12S when it was a few months old and yes it was a bit of faff to change it, had to remove couple of boards to access the battery, once replaced things were fine.

Presumably yours is a new tranny therefore rather surprising it needs a replacement already.

PDR

Someone suggested that it might have become dislodged, so I opened up the Tx to find out. It's a but fiddly, but not that difficult. The battery wasn't loose or mis-fitted. I removed it and refitted it, then put the Tx back together. No change. Then I thought to check in the menus and sure enough the RTC battery voltage is near the end of the hardware menu (long-press on System, 6th page, scroll to the end). It's showing 0.85v which, given that the CR1220 is a 3v lithium cell, tends to suggest that (to use the techie jargon) it's shagged.

I ordered one for click and collect from Halfords down the road (on the basis they have short queues), but they haven't told me it's ready yet (the gits!) so I'll just ignore it for now. The same menu has an option to switch off the RTC battery check on startup - don't think I'll do that just yet.

PDR
There are no shortcuts on the long, hard road to success. But if your dad's rich there could a limo service...

PDR

Got the new battery this morning, dismantled the Tx *again* (getting well practiced!), fitted it, reassembled and with a little trepidation switched on. There was no warning on switch-on, and the RTC battery voltage is now showing on the hardware page as 3.27v which sounds healthier!

On power-up the Tx date was showing as Jan 1st 1976, so I set the date & time and rebooted. The Tx date *then* showed as Jan 1st 2000, so I set the date & time and rebooted again. This time it stayed, and has remained correct when I rechecked an hour later. This is the double reboot process which many of the existing users have mentioned - I assume one initialises the RTC chip and the second sets the current time at the firmware layer(?). Whatever - it now works. I'll be sending the original battery back to NEC with the suggestion they could use it as a suppository.

PDR
There are no shortcuts on the long, hard road to success. But if your dad's rich there could a limo service...

paulinfrance

I am following this as my 10 + year old FX-30 will need a replacement sooner or later, but a shame I won't be able to run my 41 mhz gear on it, :-\ 
 I don't mind if I have to tell it twice to do something, my wife sometimes to tell me more than 3 times, ^-^  only the Weight might put me off,,

 Keep it coming PDR. :af
Mode 2 THE only way to fly

PDR

May 06, 2020, 23:44:03 pm #16 Last Edit: May 13, 2020, 07:26:02 am by PDR
So this evening I continued my journey by looking at the mixers. This should probably be sub-titled "PDR does something stupid again"...

I thought I'd try a simple elevon mixer. I prefer "real" subjects, so I dug out a simple indoor depron delta which has the spectrum AR6400 "brick" receiver/servo/ESC unit, aileron servo and brushed motor from a parkzone Su-26 (there's a clue here - it becomes important later). One of the reasons for this choice is that this model is small enough to fly in the garden (if it's calm) so I can not only try out my X10s but also get some flying in despite the lock-down!

This should have been simple - two lines in the mixer for each elevon and straight-through for throttle and rudder. But I went through an our of things coming out on the wrong channels, only one elevon working, the rudder refusing to play and the motor working some times but
not others. I naturally assumed that my mixer syntax or layout was wrong, and so kept fiddling with it, moving the lines around between channels and generally tinkering without being logical for over an hour, cursing the way the mixing syntax didn't work as described in the manual.

The truth was (of course) that they did, and that my first attempt was correct, but this was hidden by things that I would have spotted in seconds if I'd just stopped tinkering and looked at it logically. Those things were (in no particular order):

1. The default channel order. From my first Futaba digimax in 1977 until around 2005 I was a confirmed futaba man (Digimax 5, M, M-FM, J8, F(gold), FF7, FFs7) before I was seduced by the software of the Multiplex Evo. So for me the "correct" channel order will always be AETR, and soon after loading OpenTx I changed it to this setting. At least I thought I had, but I'd been sloppy and not noticed that what I'd selected was actually AERT. (first DOH!)

2. The separate rudder servo (which was actually the aileron servo in the original model) was on its last legs, and died about 10 minutes into the exercise which is why it didn't respond - nothing to do with my Tx settings (second DOH!).

3. Like many indoor models this one was powered with a 150mAh single cell. I used to do a lot of indoor flying and I have a box of them, but I haven't used any for around five years. I had charged up a couple, but they were pretty knackered and so their voltage fell off very quickly. So while the motor initially ran, within about 10 seconds the voltage dropped far enough for the brick's ESC to go into low-voltage cut-off which is why the throttle misbehaved - nothing to do with my Tx settings (third DOH!).

4. Now we come back to that clue. This model used the two servos on the AR6400 for the elevons, with the separate 3rd servo for the rudder - it made a very neat installation. But in the original Su26 the AR6400 servos were on rudder and elevator, with the separate servo on the ailerons. So where I was expecting these servos to respond to the aileron and elevator channels they actually responded to the elevator and RUDDER channels (4th DOH!)

So to put all this together - I started by mixing Elevator+ Aileron on Ch1 and Elevator-Aileron on Ch2, with throttle (mixed with a cut-off switch using a "+MAX" line) on Ch3 and the Rudder straight through on Ch4, This did weird stuff, so I thought "Oh yes, JR channel order!". So I put the elevon mixer line on Ch2 & 3, moved the throttle to Ch1 and left the rudder where it was. This did weird stuff as well, , but different weird stuff. Then I essentially just moved things around at random, moving the pair of elevon mixes to different channels like I was shuffling cards! After an hour I told myself to stop and take the dog for a walk.

When I cam back I firstly checked all the setting properly - this is where I discovered I set the default to AERT rather than AETR. Then instead of just thinking "It's doing weird stuff - change something!" I looked at what it was actually doing - which sticks were doing what. If the rudder servo hadn't died and the ESC hadn't shut down this would have been screamingly obvious, but the penny dropped when I noted that one elevon responded to Aileron and Elevator as intended, but the other responded to the *Rudder* stick. So I needed to put my mixer lines in the channels that I'd normally expect to be elevator and RUDDER rather than elevator and AILERON (2 & 4). The rudder was using the servo (and thus the channel) I would normally expect to be aileron, so I moved the rudder to channel 1. In all the permutations the throttle and cut-off switch lines needed to be on Channel 3, so I put them there.

I set this up in Companion and saved it to the SD card. Inserted the SD into the Tx and voila! - it just worked. On the upside I'm now confident that I understand the mixer syntax - adding switches, conditionals, logic, computations etc now looks straightforward (the potential power of these mixers is just awesome!). I've also become very familiar with the process of editing/debugging in companion and then transferring the result to the Tx (both by USB and by moving the SD card). I've learned a lot about where to find things in the editor and emulator. So that's all good. But I wasted a couple of hours doing stupid stuff, so I think I'll change my forum name to "4-DOHs!"...

PDR
There are no shortcuts on the long, hard road to success. But if your dad's rich there could a limo service...

paulinfrance

Any reason why you don't attibute
1 = A
2 = E
3 = T
4 = R
5 = G gear
6 = P pitch/flap
7 = A2
I do this on all my planes,,
It's as you probably know the 'Futaba' way before the fasstest, 7 + channel receivers.
Mode 2 THE only way to fly

PDR

I do (see item 1), but this model used a Spectrum AR6400 "brick" with two integral servos:



The AR6400 has its servos and speed controller hardwired to channels using the JR default order. You can't change it.

PDR
There are no shortcuts on the long, hard road to success. But if your dad's rich there could a limo service...

FrankS

Quote from: paulinfrance on May 07, 2020, 06:53:49 amAny reason why you don't attibute
1 = A
2 = E
3 = T
4 = R
5 = G gear
6 = P pitch/flap
7 = A2
I do this on all my planes,,
It's as you probably know the 'Futaba' way before the fasstest, 7 + channel receivers.

I must admit I don't have any preferred channel order, and often arrange the channels for tidier wiring in the plane. e.g. if the elevator servo is on the left and rudder on the right then I might use 1 & 7 for them. On one glider that uses a slim 7 channel Rx with channels 6 & 7 on the opposite ends of the Rx I use those for the V tail and channels 1-4 for the ailerons and flaps.

Getting back to Frsky one of the things you could do is use dual receivers, say one in the fus and one in the wing with the 2nd rx allocated to channels 8-16 and then split the servo outputs in the Tx accordingly. So when you put the plane together you only need to connect up the power to the wing Rx.

PDR

Yes, you can use up to 20 receivers as far as I can see, although you can only get telemetry from one of them. You can also use receivers driven by the internal and external modules at the same time, allocating the required channels to each receiver. As I have that multi-protocol module that means I can use FrSky receivers and DSM2/X receivers in the same model - I just need to plug the Frsky Rx into a servo port (or on a Y-lead) to get power.

That in turn means that I can take a model which is currently fully fitted-out with a DSMX receiver and add the cheapest, smallest FrSky telelmetry Rx just as a telemetry hub. FrSky telemetry devices are cheap. For example there's a really useful lipo voltage sensor (costs under a tenner) which plugs into the balance connector of the battery and sends individual cell voltages. I can then set up alarms for both overall voltage level, voltage of the lowest cell and a warning that there's a cell which is lower than the others. I can even use this in a mixer so that it reduces or cuts power if the voltage gets low (like the BCO in the ESC, but working at the individual cell level).

Did I mention the build-in 2.4g spectrum analyser...?

PDR
There are no shortcuts on the long, hard road to success. But if your dad's rich there could a limo service...

FlyinBrian

I have enough trouble programming my Futaba 14SG and JR DSX9 thank you.
Basic Research is what I do - when I don't know what I'm doing!.

RobC

Pete, have a look at the Unisens-E telemetry sensor, it's not cheap but it's easy enough to swap between models, I just keep one in my Tx case and plug it into whichever model I want to fly.  It's available with a range of connector types and gives you current, pack voltage, rpm and altitude all from one device.  Then there are the FrSky Neuron range of ESCs with built in telemetry, I've got a couple and find the excellent units.  With both of these I just chain a Lipo voltage sensor in the telemetry lead for individual cell voltages.
On both of my transmitters I've set up a global for volume on a spare slider so it automatically appears on all models. 
flying's easy - it's getting it back down in one piece that's the hard part

PDR

Looks cool! I take it that it's "smartport" compatible?

PDR
There are no shortcuts on the long, hard road to success. But if your dad's rich there could a limo service...

RobC

Yep, I just leave an Sport lead ending in the battery bay on each model.  As I use XT60 on anything big enough to fit the sensor in it's worth paying for as I don't need one for every model.  I've taken to setting recent models up so I leave an MLVS lipo sensor and the Unisens-E connected together and move the pair from model to model.
I like the Jumper 4in1, I bought my first mini-heli for lockdown.  It's a Blade 130S with AR3X Safe receiver.  I plugged in the Module and selected the relevant DSM flavour, made up a bind plug, selected Bind on the Tx, powered up the heli - and it just worked.  It sorted out the channel order for me so that I could stick with AETR in the mixer, absolutely painless.
flying's easy - it's getting it back down in one piece that's the hard part

dickw

Quote from: PDR on May 07, 2020, 13:55:59 pmLooks cool! I take it that it's "smartport" compatible?

PDR
If you are interested in the UniSens there is an English translation of the manual here https://www.f5b.co.uk/unilog-in-english.html
and I buy mine direct from the maufacturer https://www.sm-modellbau.de/UniSens-E-und-Zubehoer
It works with several brands of telemetry.

Dick
Grow old disgracefully

pheasant_plucker

Renamed topic to Horus X10s Express just to highlight the model being discussed.

Gerry
Senior Administrator

The man serving me in the canteen said "Look, You can see the face of Jesus in the Margarine" The Asian guy next to me replied "I can't believe it's not Budda"

PDR

Just adding an update here - I set up a new heli (blade 230 S v2) ready to fly when the batteries arrive. In the process I discovered that this Tx with the Jumper multi-protocol module set to DSMX/11msec can work with the telemetry devices from the DSMX receiver. This was implied, but not explicitly stated, in the manual but I have confirmed it does indeed work.

PDR
There are no shortcuts on the long, hard road to success. But if your dad's rich there could a limo service...

fokker

The only thing I wish the Horus had is a camera. It would make it far easier for creating model images instead of having to go running to
A laptop or pc that I rarely use now. Like most I rely on my phone and tablet.

PDR

Well you kinda need the PC/laptop to run Companion (it's much easier to set stuff up on Companion than it is in the Tx itself), but the Horus does have a bluetooth transceiver so it wouldn't surprise me if you could load pictures from your phone via that. But I haven't checked that bit.

PDR 
There are no shortcuts on the long, hard road to success. But if your dad's rich there could a limo service...

fokker

I rarely use companion I usually setup on the tx. I know old fashioned.Ive done an image tonight from my phone by signing into iCloud on the laptop. It took me over an hour because there was a ridiculously large update sat there waiting to install.  I did think about the Bluetooth but it's the image size that could be a problem and also how to transfer.

Kevin Fairgrieve (NSS)

A lot of stock models are available to download from SkyRaccoon.

He will even do you a custom job if you send him a picture of your model. I have had a couple done lately.

SkyRaccoon